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Alejandra Martinez

Alejandra Martinez is the associate producer for WLRN&rsquo's Sundial. Her love for radio started at her mother’s beauty shop where she noticed that stories are all around her - important stories to tell.

When she took her first audio storytelling class in college, she was sold to the world of public radio journalism. She feels that audio blocks out the world and creates a single intimate connection.

This native Texan began her radio career interning for Latino USA in New York City where she reported stories on Texas politics, immigration, culture and arts. She then worked with KUT Austin’s NPR station as an intern and later a producer where she produced stories, worked on social media content and special projects, including launching the KUT Book Club. She participated in NPR’s Next-Generation Radio project, a week-long digital and radio journalism boot camp, where she covered Houston’s recovery post-Hurricane Harvey.

Ale graduated from The University of Texas at Austin School of Journalism in December 2017 and moved to Miami shortly after. She considers herself a coffee fanatic, a bookworm and the queen of digital. When she moved to South Florida and noticed all the Instagram-able spots around town she fell in love. She was amazed by the huge Latino population and rich culture of the region and has a true desire to share the stories of what make South Florida so great.

Connect with Alejandra on Twitter: @_martinez_ale and send her pitches at amartinez@wlrnnews.org

In South Florida, high school football has seen a decline in participation amid growing health concerns. Oxbridge Academy in West Palm Beach recently shut down its program after the coach said they couldn’t get enough players to field a team.

The City of Miami will ask voters in November whether or not to make the city mayor the most powerful individual in the city government’s power structure. 

More than a year after Hurricane Irma, blue tarps still lay on roofs across South Florida. According to the Miami Herald, tens of thousands of homeowners across the state are still waiting for assistance to pay for damages to their houses and many have sued insurance companies.

A Florida International University assistant professor of psychology is working to find ways to combat non-consensual porn, or sexually graphic images that are shared without consent.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida (ACLU of Florida) has taken a public stance on a number of the constitutional amendments Floridians are supposed to vote on in November.

Money is one of the biggest determinants when it comes to deciding whether to evacuate during a hurricane.

The results of a 1,000-person questionnaire conducted by the National Hurricane Survival Initiative found one in five Floridians won’t evacuate during a hurricane. It also suggests Floridians aren’t as prepared as they should be for the storms.

Two immigration attorneys are fighting to protect the rights of LGBTQ asylum seekers facing persecution in their home countries.

On Saturday, Sept. 15, O Cinema Wynwood is hosting a panel about immigration issues focused on how they impact the LGBTQ community. They will be screening a documentary web-series titled “Finding Home” about LGBTQ asylum seekers in Los Angeles.

The U.S. Geological Survey, USGS, is collecting DNA to track a new snake hybrid in the Everglades.

State Representative Carlos Guillermo Smith of Orlando argues a new anti-bullying scholarship fails to protect LGBTQ victims.

A recent Florida Atlantic University poll has Congressman Ron DeSantis and Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam in a virtual tie in the race to be the Republican candidate for Florida's governor, but 22 percent of Republican voters remain undecided.

As Florida prepares for primaries on Aug. 28, issues around voting security and fraud have been front and center. Earlier this month, Sen. Bill Nelson claimed Russian hackers had gained access to valuable data on state voters. And two weeks ago, a story broke about an 11-year-old hacking into a replica of Florida’s elections website. 

A new group is using what they learned in the military to fight threats to South Florida's coral reefs.

A deadly chemical that targets baby mosquitoes is much more effective when attacking Zika virus than traditional insecticides, according to a new study.

Florida’s Public Service Commission (FPSC) has new recommendations to improve electrical systems after a hurricane. 

In their new report, “Review of Florida’s Electric Utility Hurricane Preparedness and Restoration Actions 2018,” the FPSC used data collected from past hurricane reviews and identified tree trimming, underground power lines and utility workers as critical areas to hurricane preparedness.