Abe Aboraya

Health News Florida reporter Abe Aboraya works for WMFE in Orlando. He started writing for newspapers in high school. After graduating from the University of Central Florida in 2007, he spent a year traveling and working as a freelance reporter for the Seattle Times and the Seattle Weekly, and working for local news websites in the San Francisco Bay area. Most recently Abe worked as a reporter for the Orlando Business Journal. He comes from a family of health care workers.

Contact Abe at 407-273-2300 x 183 on Twitter @AbeAboraya or by email

Insurer Aetna was making a profit selling health insurance under the Affordable Care Act when it exited Florida.

Sunscreen is more effective than an umbrella at preventing sunburns – but may not be enough to completely prevent sunburns.


Per capita, Osceola County has the worst rates in Florida for asthma hospitalizations and the second worst rate for emergency room visits for asthma.

But a free lung clinic is helping residents breathe easy.

As 2016 winds down, we’re taking another listen to some of the best news stories we discussed on Florida Matters throughout the year.

At a meeting for young stroke survivors at the University of Central Florida’s Aphasia House, it’s craft time.

Here, a few of the young people who have had strokes are chatting. They melt peppermints into cookie cutter shapes. But the crafts are really just pretext for hanging out and chatting with people who know what it’s like to survive a stroke at a young age.

Florida Hospital is gearing up to open a home for transplant patients.

The Bartch House at Florida Hospital in Orlando is expected to open soon. It will be a low-cost or free home away from home for organ transplant patients and their families.

Knox Medical begins delivering medical marijuana Friday in Florida.

Knox is licensed by the Florida Department of Health to grow, process and distribute medical marijuana in Central Florida. The patient receiving the marijuana lives in Osceola County.

Juan Cruz is a smartly dressed 15 year old Deltona boy: Black ball cap, bow tie, jeans and sneakers.

Sitting on a comfy leather couch, he’s handed a blue bag with his latest prescription: An orange-flavored medical marijuana spray with 10 milligrams of THC and 10 milligrams CBD per dose. He pulls it out of the bag.

Now that Florida voters have passed a medical marijuana constitutional amendment, some are already asking: Is recreational marijuana next?

Adventist Health System is being sued under a class action lawsuit, alleging the company has underfunded its pension plans by $134 million dollars.

Based in Altamonte Springs, Adventist Health System owns 46 hospitals in 10 states. Adventist is Florida Hospital’s parent company, and is affiliated with the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

The University of Florida is backing out of its deal to take over Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in Lake Nona.

The U.S. Department of Justice has settled a lawsuit with the nation’s largest private nursing home company.


United For Care’s John Morgan and Jessica Spencer squared off Tuesday night in a televised medical marijuana debate.

United For Care’s John Morgan and substance abuse counselor Jessica Spencer squared off Tuesday night in a televised medical marijuana debate.


Surgical equipment used in open heart surgeries and liver transplants may have been contaminated by the manufacturer.

C. Diff is a potentially deadly bacteria that killed 29,000 people last year – and too many people are catching the bacteria at Florida hospitals.

Abe Aboraya/WMFE

12-year-old Christina Clark takes medical marijuana.

Her mother Anneliese Clark uses it to treat the seizures her daughter has had since she was three months old. At her worst, “she just literally, she wasn’t doing anything,” Anneliese Clark said. “She laid on the couch and shook and twitched.”

Orange County Sheriff’s Office released another batch of 911 calls Wednesday from the shooting at Pulse nightclub.

The calls released show the high number of calls coming in. Orange County dispatchers were unable to patch many of the calls through to Orlando Police dispatchers.

  Gerry Realin spent four hours with the dead inside of Pulse Night Club.

He remembers the blood. The smell. The scene was so bad, the eight-member Hazmat team wouldn’t let any other officers help them remove the bodies. That way fewer people had to witness what they saw.

The final shooting victim in the Pulse Night Club shooting has been released from the hospital after 86 days.

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