Abe Aboraya

Health News Florida reporter Abe Aboraya works for WMFE in Orlando. He started writing for newspapers in high school. After graduating from the University of Central Florida in 2007, he spent a year traveling and working as a freelance reporter for the Seattle Times and the Seattle Weekly, and working for local news websites in the San Francisco Bay area. Most recently Abe worked as a reporter for the Orlando Business Journal. He comes from a family of health care workers.

Contact Abe at 407-273-2300 x 183 on Twitter @AbeAboraya or by email

Florida senators will begin hashing out possible medical marijuana laws this week.

Older Americans who have not yet reached Medicare age are among the groups hardest hit by the Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act.

An analysis by The Associated Press shows that many of those who buy their own health insurance stand to pay thousands of dollars more.

Mass shootings in Orlando and Fort Lauderdale have brought conversations about gun rights and restrictions front and center this legislative session. 

An Orlando police officer diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder after the Pulse shooting has been ordered back to work.

The Orange County Sheriff’s Office is warning about a surge in heroin overdoses.


The mother of a victim of the Pulse Night Club shooting will be watching from the Capitol tonight as President Donald Trump gives an address to a joint session of Congress.

Democratic State Senator Victor Torres filed a bill Tuesday to allow first responders to get worker’s compensation coverage for post-traumatic stress disorder.

Mark, flickr

Florida voters overwhelmingly approved Amendment 2 last November, expanding the state's medical marijuana program. But how is the government going to implement it? 


Daylina Miller / WUSF

The Florida Department of Health is working to implement Amendment 2 as soon as possible. But public hearings have been contentious across the state. The raucous meetings were standing room only, with crowds cheering and booing.


First responders who get post-traumatic stress disorder on the job soon may be eligible for more workers compensation benefits.

There’s a lot of confusion in Florida when it comes to medical marijuana.

There are existing laws, Amendment 2 that was passed by voters but still needs to go through the legislature, and somewhere in between, the Florida Department of Health is issuing rules.

A new bill filed Wednesday has the potential to completely revamp Florida’s medical marijuana system – and remove caps on the number of growers.

Oviedo Medical Research begins screening patients Monday for a novel treatment for chronic constipation – a vibrating capsule. 

Insurer Aetna was making a profit selling health insurance under the Affordable Care Act when it exited Florida.

Sunscreen is more effective than an umbrella at preventing sunburns – but may not be enough to completely prevent sunburns.


Per capita, Osceola County has the worst rates in Florida for asthma hospitalizations and the second worst rate for emergency room visits for asthma.

But a free lung clinic is helping residents breathe easy.

As 2016 winds down, we’re taking another listen to some of the best news stories we discussed on Florida Matters throughout the year.

At a meeting for young stroke survivors at the University of Central Florida’s Aphasia House, it’s craft time.

Here, a few of the young people who have had strokes are chatting. They melt peppermints into cookie cutter shapes. But the crafts are really just pretext for hanging out and chatting with people who know what it’s like to survive a stroke at a young age.

Florida Hospital is gearing up to open a home for transplant patients.

The Bartch House at Florida Hospital in Orlando is expected to open soon. It will be a low-cost or free home away from home for organ transplant patients and their families.

Knox Medical begins delivering medical marijuana Friday in Florida.

Knox is licensed by the Florida Department of Health to grow, process and distribute medical marijuana in Central Florida. The patient receiving the marijuana lives in Osceola County.

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