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Marchers — many of them women — are descending on Washington, D.C., to send a message about abortion to the Trump administration and the Republican-led Congress.

If that sounds like déjà vu, it's not: What the organizers call the March for Life is a protest against legalized abortion, unlike the Women's March last week, which included support for abortion rights in its platform.

A different kind of march

Florida House Democrats protested Republican Speaker Richard Corcoran’s decision to give a platform to a man they said is a racist.

Florida U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson on Wednesday unveiled a $1 trillion plan aimed at rebuilding the nation's crumbling, roads, bridges and airports. During a visit to Tampa, Nelson says it would create more than 15 million new jobs by fixing roads, expanding bus and rail systems and modernizing ports and rebuild public schools.

Donald Trump has been president for less than a week, but fact checkers are already busy. WUSF's Steve Newborn talks with Katie Sanders of PolitiFact Florida about one claim the new president made during his inauguration, and another a day later at the CIA.

Florida’s Cabinet is dealing with an embattled agency in flux.  Friday Department of Environmental Protection secretary Jon Steverson resigned—effective February third.  Now Governor Rick Scott is lining up a special cabinet meeting next week to fill the vacancy.

House Speaker Richard Corcoran and Governor Rick Scott are in a stand-off when it comes to incentives.  After Tuesday’s Cabinet meeting the governor defended using public money to boost business in the state.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

The event opened with a rally, to be followed by the march proper — which had a path laid out from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.

Steve Newborn / WUSF News

While hundreds of thousands gathered on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. to witness the presidential inauguration, some enthusiastic crowds cheered on the new president closer to home.

A raucous crowd of Republicans filled the back room of the Beef O'Brady's restaurant on Himes Avenue in Tampa to cheer on Donald Trump.

One of those was Terri Castro, the office manager for the North Tampa Trump campaign.

Donald Trump is now the 45th president of the United States. NPR reporters and editors across the newsroom have annotated his inaugural address.

Follow NPR's full online coverage with our live blog.

A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first."

Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage."

NPR's Live Inauguration 2017 Blog and Fact Check

Jan 20, 2017
NPR's Live Coverage of 2017 Inauguration
iStock Images

NPR News will air Special Coverage of the Presidential Inauguration today. Check out our live blog, updating throughout the day’s events and a fact check and annotation of Donald Trump’s Inaugural Address.

The Live Blog will run from approximately 7 a.m. until 6 p.m. (or later, as news warrants).

Follow the Live Blog HERE.

The Fact Check will run from noon until Trump's speech ends, probably about an hour.

President Obama gave his final press conference at the White House on Wednesday, just two days before Donald Trump's inauguration. He reflected on his time in office and looked toward the incoming administration, ultimately concluding, "At my core, I think we're going to be OK."

The center of the world's attention will be on the steps of the U.S. Capitol Friday, when Donald Trump is inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States.

Wikipedia Commons

Can you really "drive" a driverless car in Florida without a permit? And is the foreign policy hawk Senator Marco Rubio really pushing for a bill to cut security at embassies overseas by half?  WUSF's Steve Newborn mulls over those claims with Josh Gillin of PolitiFact Florida.

The sometimes raucous presidential debates gave plenty of fodder to fact-checkers in 2016. So it's no surprise that the Top Five most-viewed rulings from PolitiFact Florida revolve around claims made by the candidates. WUSF's Steve Newborn takes a look at them with PolitiFact's Josh Gillin.

In honor of the end of 2016, we take this look at the Top 5 most-clicked stories of the year from PolitiFact Florida:

Courtesy Suzanne Young, 350 organizer.

Activist organizations rallied outside Senator Marco Rubio's Tampa office Monday to protest what they're calling President-Elect Donald Trump's "Climate Denial Cabinet."

A new report from legislative researchers could spell more bad news for Enterprise Florida.  Analysts say the agency is lagging behind similar programs in other states.

Bobbie O'Brien / WUSF Public Media

From a sit-in Tuesday in Alabama to sign-waving protestors Wednesday outside Tampa's federal courthouse, there appears to be a ground swell of people objecting to President-Elect Donald Trump's nominee for Attorney General, U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL).

Photo courtesy PolitiFact Florida

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is saying the federal government is shortchanging the state when it comes to doling out money to fight the transmission of the Zika virus. WUSF's Steve Newborn talks with Katie Sanders of PolitiFact Florida to see if it's true.

Will Weatherford Rules Out Run For Governor

Dec 22, 2016
Twitter.com

Former state House Speaker Will Weatherford said Thursday he will not run for governor in 2018, eliminating one potential high-profile candidate to replace Gov. Rick Scott.

Weatherford, a Wesley Chapel Republican who became speaker in 2012 at age 32, pointed to his family as a reason for staying out of the race.

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