Politics

Political news

Gov. Rick Scott gave his sixth State of the State address recently. He touched on some familiar themes, such as claiming to have helped create more than a million new jobs. WUSF's Steve Newborn talks with Allison Graves of PolitiFact Florida to examine Scott's claims on commercial leases, teacher pay, tax cuts - and of course, jobs.

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum has only been running for governor for about a week, but he’s already facing a controversy about his use of a political email system. Now Gillum says he will comply with an investigation.

House Votes To Abolish Enterprise Florida

Mar 10, 2017
Steve Newborn / WUSF News

Locked in a battle with Gov. Rick Scott, House Speaker Richard Corcoran on Friday got what he believes are more than symbolic votes to kill the business-recruitment agency Enterprise Florida and revamp tourism-marketer Visit Florida.

But Scott quickly returned fire by saying bipartisan House votes on two bills would harm Florida's economy and slow job creation. Questions also remain about the issues in the Senate, where companion bills have not been filed and some leaders have expressed support for business-recruitment programs and tourism spending.

It appears a one million dollar contract could cost Visit Florida much, much more.  The House is moving forward with a plan to cut the agency’s funding by two thirds and establish more stringent oversight.

A bill aimed at clearing up confusion around redistricting court cases is ready for a vote on the Senate floor. But there are still concerns the plan challenges the independence of the judiciary.

Florida lawmakers are considering shutting down community redevelopment agencies, citing reports of misuse of public money. Supporters are hoping to strike a compromise, before the Legislature kills CRAs outright.

Former North Florida Congresswoman Gwen Graham and Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum say Governor Rick Scott’s address to lawmakers is off the mark. Gillum has already declared his 2018 gubernatorial candidacy and Tuesday Graham moved a step closer to declaring her own plans.

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The Florida legislative session has begun, which means it’s time to get serious about the state’s budget.  But the past few months of prologue have done little to bring the parties together.

Gov. Rick Scott took his fight for business incentives directly to critics Tuesday, using his "State of the State" address to defend requests for tens of millions of dollars to lure companies to Florida and to market the state's tourism industry.

Courtesy Tampa Bay Times

Florida's legislative session is just beginning, but the battle over Governor Rick Scott's most prized programs has been going on for a while. 

Florida Supreme Court justices are considering allowing hundreds of thousands of ex-felons to vote. They heard arguments from Floridians For a Fair Democracy on a ballot initiative that would restore voting rights for residents who have completed their sentences.

The war between House Speaker Richard Corcoran and Governor Rick Scott over corporate tax breaks appears to be claiming another casualty.

State lawmakers are pushing to track sentencing as a way to stamp out disparities in how penalties are doled out.  But at its first hearing, the measure was put on hold.

Quincy Walters / WUSF News

Gloria Horner stands along Bayfront Drive in Sarasota, wearing a red "MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN" cap, a shirt that says "TRUMP 2020" and a handmade sign that reads "MAKING AMERICA GREAT!" 


One of the big debates taking shape this legislative session is about state involvement in economic development. The capitol’s powerbrokers are picking sides in the battle, which is threatening to derail session before it even begins.

Florida Republican lawmakers are pushing punitive immigrant and refugee legislation once again this session. Similar proposals died last year. But the 2016 campaign season may be stimulating an appetite for change.

Battle lines are being drawn in Florida over a perennially thorny issue: Guns.  State lawmakers have filed over a dozen bills seeking changes to existing gun laws. 

One bill is making waves in advance of Tuesday's opening of the legislative session Tallahassee. It would restrict the rights of cities and counties to pass laws that haven't been given the OK by the state. And it is being backed by the speaker of the Florida House.

Laws passed by local governments - such as minimum wage raises, rules to curb pollution and protection for LGBT people - would be null and void, unless they have been given specific permission from the state Legislature.

State lawmakers will consider a raft of gun bills this session primarily aimed at expanding rights.  But one representative is focused on making it easier to get firearms out of abusive households.

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