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Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended a Democratic county elections supervisor Friday who failed to meet deadlines during recounts after November’s election, but her supporters said the move was unwarranted and political.

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There's going to be a crowded ballot to become the next mayor of Tampa. Eight people qualified to run by the Friday afternoon deadline.

The candidates will on March 5 to replace Bob Buckhorn, who's term-limited from running again.

As thousands of women gather in solidarity this weekend, Tallahassee will be hosting its own women’s march. After low participation last year, a larger turnout is expected this time.

Republican State Senator Joe Gruters, representing Florida's 23rd District, is the new President of the Florida Republican Party. Gruters won handidly during the annual GOP conference in Orlando last Saturday, defeating Charlotte County Republican Bob Starr.

As the partial government shutdown approaches the one-month mark, members of one branch of the military are feeling its effects particularly hard: the Coast Guard. Here, in coastal Southwest Florida, one family-owned establishment is helping those in need.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

In Florida, voter pre-registration is open to both 16 and 17-year-olds, which means their private information like phone numbers, addresses, and birthdates is public record. Two Florida lawmakers are trying to change that.

Courtesy USCG Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael De Nyse

U.S. Coast Guard members are still on the job, rescuing people and guarding national waters.

But with the government shutdown in effect, they're not getting paid. 

Roberto Roldan/WUSF

The tensions that have been seen in the past between Tampa, St. Petersburg and Clearwater seem to have largely dissipated.

Steve Newborn / WUSF Public Media

New State Senate President Bill Galvano says he has high hopes for new era of cooperation in Tallahassee this year.

"It's time to return respect and honor to government," he said during a meeting of the Argus Foundation Tuesday in Sarasota.

State Senator Jeff Brandes believes the Florida Legislature is now organized in a way that will lead to more insurance issues being heard and ultimately solved. The Office of Insurance Regulation held it’s 2019 summit this week.

Gov. Ron DeSantis threatened on Tuesday to sanction Airbnb over what he called the home-sharing platform's anti-Semitic move to cease its operations along Israel's West Bank. The company has removed more than 200 listings in Israeli settlements in recent months, due to the dispute the homes have fueled with Palestinians.

Flanked by South Florida Jewish community leaders at the Jewish Federation of South Palm Beach County in Boca Raton, DeSantis said Airbnb's decision violates a state law that prohibits Florida from working with companies that boycott Israel.

Courtesy Bay News 9

Sara Roberts McCarley easily defeated two other candidates in Tuesday's special election for the Lakeland City Commission.

Steve Newborn / WUSF Public Media

President Donald Trump's Cuba policy is driving millions of dollars from the island's private entrepreneurs to its state-run tourism sector, the opposite of its supposed goal, according to new government figures.

Courtesy Bay News 9

Voters in Lakeland will go to the polls Tuesday. They'll elect a city commissioner to fill the remainder of the term left when Michael Dunn resigned after killing a suspected shoplifter at his Army and Navy surplus store.

The candidates are Patrick Shawn Jones, Sara Roberts McCarley and Bill Watts.

Jones, 53, is a surgical technician at Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center. He's also a heavy metal DJ for WMNF Radio in Tampa.

Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis has chosen a second Miami appeals court judge for a seat on the Florida Supreme Court.

DeSantis announced Monday that Robert Luck is his latest choice. Luck, a former Miami federal prosecutor and circuit court judge, currently serves on the 3rd District Court of Appeal.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

President Trump has denied keeping details of his meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin from his own administration.

"I'm not keeping anything under wraps. I couldn't care less," Trump said in an interview with Jeanine Pirro on Fox News on Saturday night.

Amid the U.S. Government shutdown now going on 20 days, federal employees and their agencies in Florida are feeling it in different ways. Still, the question of when the shutdown will end looms over the minds of many.

Ron DeSantis' Busy First 96 Hours As Governor

Jan 14, 2019

From decisions on ethics, to the environment, to a Supreme Court pick, Ron DeSantis got a lot done in his first four days as Governor of the state of Florida.

Though it’s far too early to make conclusions about the way DeSantis will lead, it does appear the Republican governor is “trying to take some steps that will have broad appeal,” said Jim Saunders, Executive Editor for News Service of Florida, Friday on The Florida Roundup.

Long-time federal contractor John Woodson arrived at an unemployment office in Washington, D.C. early Thursday morning. Ordinarily, Woodson would be receiving a paycheck, but because of the partial government shutdown, Woodson spent his day filing an unemployment claim instead.

"We should still be at work right now," said Woodson. "Politicians should handle this — don't put this on the citizens. You're hurting us."

Even if Woodson can get unemployment, which pays up to $425 a week in D.C., he says it won't be enough to care for his family.

The Republican Party of Florida has elected a new leader.

State Sen. Joe Gruters of Sarasota was chosen to lead the state GOP at the party's annual meeting in Orlando Saturday.

The Republican Party of Florida has elected a new leader.

State Senator Joe Gruters of Sarasota was chosen to lead the state GOP at the party's annual meeting in Orlando Saturday.

As federal workers miss their first paychecks since the partial government shutdown began three weeks ago, frustration, anxiety and anger are rising.

Across the country this week, federal workers and industry leaders are starting to organize and rally to demand an end to the partial government shutdown.

"Trump, open the government — today," chanted the hundreds of federal employees and aviation industry executives gathered on the Capitol lawn in Washington, D.C., Thursday.

It took three full weeks — 21 days — for President Bill Clinton and the Republican Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich to settle an impasse that partially shut down the government in 1995-96.

That particular moment is a landmark in U.S. political history, birthing a new era of American gridlock that arguably led to the sharp partisanship that has gripped the nation — and delivered a new record for a partial government shutdown, marking Day 22 on Saturday.

The idea of civility in politics has become almost a quaint idea in some circles. A nonpartisan group called Better Angels is advancing the notion that we can talk about our differences - respectfully. They'll be getting an equal number of Republicans and Democrats together tonight.

Pointing to a denial of due process, a federal judge ordered Gov. Ron DeSantis to give former Broward County elections chief Brenda Snipes the opportunity to tell her side of the story after former Gov. Rick Scott stripped her of the job.

Snipes, a Democrat appointed by former Gov. Jeb Bush and subsequently re-elected four times, announced Nov. 18 she would step down as supervisor, effective Jan. 4, after a turbulent election.

DeSantis Uses Seized Plane To Travel State

Jan 10, 2019

Gov. Ron DeSantis made his first trip out of Tallahassee aboard an upgraded King Air aircraft that law-enforcement officials had seized in a drug bust.

Unlike his predecessor, former Gov. Rick Scott, a multimillionaire who could buzz around the state in his own plane, DeSantis entered the governor’s office Tuesday without a vast financial portfolio.

The seven candidates for Tampa mayor met Wednesday night for a debate in Ybor City hosted by Spectrum Bay News 9.

President Trump used his first prime-time address from the Oval Office to make the case for his controversial border wall. The president's demand for $5.7 billion in wall funding — and Democrats' opposition — has led to a partial shutdown of the federal government.

Here we check some of the arguments made by the president and top Democrats in their response.

Trump's Speech

Claim 1: Humanitarian and security crisis

"There is a growing humanitarian and security crisis at our Southern border."

President Trump delivered the first Oval Office address of his presidency Tuesday night — and it came in the midst of a protracted partial government shutdown.

There were a lot of questions going into the address, but there were at least as many afterward — especially, and most importantly: What now?

So what did we learn from the president's address and the rare Democratic response? Here are seven insights:

Just hours after the inauguration Tuesday of Gov. Ron DeSantis, his predecessor, Rick Scott, was sworn into the U.S. Senate.

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