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Tampa Karate Kid Prepares to Take on the World

It’s not every day you meet a 10-year-old who frequents words like “perseverance” and “self-control” in their vocabulary. But if you catch Sammy Gillespie talking about karate, the sport he is currently dominating, you just might find one. He is currently celebrating his new title as a karate national champion, and preparing to take on karate masters from 27 different countries at the World Karate Competition in Orlando this fall. I sat down with Sammy and his family at their New Tampa home,...
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Orangecta.com

The American Federation of Teachers is removing the president and other leaders from the Orange County Classroom Teachers Association. 

According to a report by the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), the Orange County union leaders, particularly the president, Diana Moore, were not following the rules that provide checks and balances, like ignoring the number of signatures needed on credit card purchases. There were also issues with internal elections. 

Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP

Following his own advice, Jeb Bush is taking his presidential campaign to the neighborhoods and churches where Hispanics and

African Americans live and worship in an effort to broaden his appeal among minority voters.

Making Sense of Victim Portrayals

10 hours ago

The cover of the current issue of New York Magazine is a composite shot of photographs of 35 of the women who claim to have been sexually assaulted by Bill Cosby. The corresponding feature includes highly stylized portraits of the women wearing shades of white and silver as well as the women’s individual stories, including video testimony. We talk with The Poynter Institute’s Kelly McBride about why the magazine chose to tell the story this way and how it’s being received.

“She will highlight that Republican arguments against increased engagement are part of failed policies of the past and contend that we must look to the future in order to advance a core set of values and interests to engage with Cubans and address human rights abuses,” her campaign said in a statement. Much like her speech on immigration reform in Las Vegas, in which she tried to portray herself as even more progressive than Obama, her speech at FIU will be Clinton’s first chance to double down on the president’s move in December to normalize U.S.-Cuba diplomatic relations. The 11 a.m. speech will follow her address to the National Urban League, a civil-rights organization, in Fort Lauderdale earlier Friday.

For the past three years, public health activists have been trying to convince Florida lawmakers to support a needle-exchange program to fight the HIV epidemic in South Florida, and for the past three years they’ve been turned down.

One Miami activist refuses to wait for lawmakers. George Gibson is an ordained minister. Nearly everyone calls him Elder as in a church elder.

He says his needle-exchange program is related to his religious work.

“I see it as being an AIDS ministry,” he said.

It’s not every day you meet a 10-year-old who frequents words like “perseverance” and “self-control” in their vocabulary. But if you catch Sammy Gillespie talking about karate, the sport he is currently dominating, you just might find one.

He is currently celebrating his new title as a karate national champion, and preparing to take on karate masters from 27 different countries at the World Karate Competition in Orlando this fall.

President Barack Obama is unveiling an updated national strategy Thursday to combat the HIV and AIDS epidemic that could have a big impact in Florida, which leads the nation in new HIV infections.

The White House unveiled the first national HIV plan in 2010, with ambitious, measurable goals: reduce new HIV diagnoses, increase the number of youth with an undetectable HIV viral load, and reduce the death rate from AIDS.

There’s been positive progress on all those, and there’s been a drop in the number of women, heterosexuals and IV-drug users contracting the disease.

Families hoped for a miracle even as science nagged that one was improbable and rescue crews went into a seventh day of searches Thursday for two teens missing at sea.

Though it seemed unlikely a medley of agencies would continue their hunts much longer, the Coast Guard, which is leading the effort, insisted it remained an “active and open” case now focused off the South Carolina coastline.

“We’re still searching,” Chief Petty Officer Ryan Doss said Wednesday evening, with no immediate end in sight.

The Florida Department of Health confirmed a case of the West Nile Virus, a mosquito-borne disease, in Volusia County Wednesday.

  Health officials are expecting more cases, and warn residents to get rid of standing water and wear protective clothing.

Most West Nile Virus infections are mild, but about one percent of cases can cause permanent neurological damage, paralysis and even death. There is no treatment or vaccine for the virus.

Wikipedia Commons

The diplomatic thaw with Cuba has led to a new collaboration with scientists in that country to study the ghost orchid, one of the world's rarest flowers, U.S. officials said Wednesday.

Ernesto Mujica of Cuba's Ministry of Science ECOVIDA Research Center has joined researchers from Illinois College and the University of Florida in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge to study ghost orchids, the delicate blooms that star in the book "The Orchid Thief" and the movie "Adaptation."

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