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M.S. Butler

Florida Matters Preview: Homelessness Among Florida's Students

When it comes to children, the definition of homeless includes more children than you may think. Under the federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act children and youth who "lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence are considered homeless." That means children who are living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camp grounds -- or doubled-up with relatives or friends --are homeless, as well as those who stay in shelters, on the street or in abandoned buildings. This week on...
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Florida officials are asking the Seminole Tribe when it plans to end card games at its casinos and the tribe has responded—with a request for mediation.

Auto Insurer Pushes For Hospital Contracts

5 hours ago

State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance is asking the Florida Supreme Court to take up a dispute about whether a Jacksonville hospital needs to turn over information about contracts with health insurers.

A three-judge panel of the 1st District Court of Appeal last month ruled in favor of Shands Jacksonville Medical Center, which now is known as UF Health Jacksonville, in the dispute stemming from personal-injury protection auto-insurance claims.

M.S. Butler

When it comes to children, the definition of homeless includes more children than you may think.

Under the federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act children and youth who "lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence are considered homeless." That means children who are living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camp grounds -- or doubled-up with relatives or friends  --are homeless, as well as those who stay in shelters, on the street or in abandoned buildings.

Execution Cocktail Arguments Continue

5 hours ago

Lawyers for Death Row inmate Jerry Correll on Monday backed a decision by the Florida Supreme Court to send his case back to a circuit judge, after Attorney General Pam Bondi's office asked justices to reconsider the decision.

Two Gainesville residents face multiple charges following an argument that escalated into gunshots being fired outside a University of Florida dormitory.

University police Maj. Brad Barber told The Gainesville Sun an argument broke out as people were leaving a bar.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

At the First Presbyterian Church of New Port Richey, 5-year-old George Blowers IV snaps together pieces of a toy pirate ship with the help of a Red Cross volunteer.

A Red Cross volunteer plays with George Blowers IV in the toy room at the First Presbyterian Church of Port Richey after his parent's kitchen and his bedroom flooded in their New Port Richey home.Credit Daylina Miller/WUSFEdit | Remove

AP

Just six months ago, Gov. Rick Scott stood onstage outside the state Capitol basking in his hard-fought victory as he began his second term.

Scott boldly proclaimed in his inaugural address that the campaign was over, and while there would be "robust debates on the best direction for Florida" that "we should not let partisan politics, or any politics for that matter, get in our way."

Pasco County

 A weekend of unrelenting rain has left large portions of Tampa Bay flooded. Areas of Pasco County received the brunt of the impact, where an evacuation order still stands in Elfers in Southwest Pasco. Officials at the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) expect flood waters will remain in the Elfers and Trinity Oaks areas for the next few days.

For those seeking refuge from the rising tides, the American Red Cross Shelter at First Presbyterian Church in Port Richey is open; seven people have already made use of this resource in the last 24 hours. 

The Schultz Center

At one point, the Schultz Center had state funding and a big, multi-million dollar contract with Duval County schools to help teachers improve their craft.

The Schultz Center has trained thousands of teachers since it was founded in Jacksonville in 1997. But when state revenues declined, the Schultz Center funding was cut.

“The recession happened,” said Deborah Gianoulis, president of the Schultz Center. “That [state budget] line-item was never restored.”

As U.S. citizens, Puerto Ricans are relatively easy to register to vote, and they are attracting unprecedented attention because they could change the political calculus in a state that President Obama won by the thinnest of margins in 2012: 50 percent to 49.1 percent. “It’s a potential game changer for the state,” said Mark Hugo Lopez, director of Hispanic Research at the Pew Research Center. “It’s the biggest movement of people out of Puerto Rico since the great migration of the 1950s.”

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